Extension Logo
Extension Logo
University of Minnesota Extension
https://extension.umn.edu

Growing and caring for amaryllis

See this page in: English

Whether the first bulb or the fiftieth, there is high anticipation for the plant owner when the large, bright green bud emerges from a beefy amaryllis bulb!

'Fantasica' red with white center flowering amaryllis
'Fantasica' amaryllis
'Picotee' white with thin red edge flowering amarayllis
'Picotee' amarayllis
'Striped Amadeus' light pink with red edge flowering amaryllis
'Striped Amadeus' amaryllis
'Red Pearl' red flowering amaryllis
'Red Pearl' armayllis

Amaryllis may be purchased as bare or planted bulbs, and are prized for their exotic trumpet-shaped flowers born on 1 to 2 foot leafless stalks or scapes. They add dramatic color to homes and gardens, and make wonderful gifts to gardeners from beginners to experts.

Native to Peru and South Africa, the genus Amaryllis comes from the Greek word amarysso, which means "to sparkle." Bulbs were brought to Europe in the 1700s and have been known to bloom for up to 75 years. Today, most amaryllis are hybrids but are still classified in the genus Hippeastrum.

Amaryllis flowers range from 4 to 10 inches in size, and can be either single or double in form.

While the most popular colors are red and white, flowers may also be pink, salmon, apricot, rose or deep burgundy. Some varieties are bicolor such as purple and green, or picotee (having petals with a different edge color).

Selecting, planting and caring for bulbs

Amaryllis bulbs come in various sizes. Whether purchasing a bare bulb to plant or bulbs planted in a pot, the size and condition of bulbs will influence amaryllis performance.

 | 

Mary Meyer, Extension horticulturalist and Julie Weisenhorn, Extension educator

Reviewed in 2018

Share this page:

© 2018 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer.